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Wynonna Earp showcases the power of a demonic snickerdoodle

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Wynonna Earp airs Fridays at 9 p.m. E.T. on Space. Photo courtesy Bell Media
Wynonna Earp airs Fridays at 9 p.m. E.T. on Space. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Spoilers follow for Wynonna Earp Season 3, Episode 5, “Jolene.”

We ended off last week’s episode with a stranger named Jolene treating our favourite Purgatory residents with baked goods that apparently cause them to lose their sense of logic and rationale. A great pastry has that effect, really.

The influence of Jolene bleeds through the opening of this week’s Wynonna Earp episode titled – hold onto your hats – “Jolene.” It’s made clear that the scrumptious snacks she creates have a jarring effect whenever eaten, essentially causing Jo-Jo (as Wynonna lovingly refers to her) to be the centre of one’s universe. Let’s be real, anyone who offers up a freshly-out-of-the-oven-pie gains a point or two in my book. When Jolene quickly stuffs Mama Gibson’s face to further her control over the Crew, the Earps and Doc decide on heading to Gibson Farm, where Waverly was born, in order to summon and bind the demon vying to kill her (unbeknownst to everyone, said demon is the cream puff master standing before them).

Although Jolene is a mysteriously sinister force of evil determined to rid this world of the glory that is Waverly Earp, I do have to commend her on using my most commonly used excuse to get out of social engagements: “Oh, I can’t go to the party… I have so much baking to do!” After she convinces Doc to replace his resident Gun Slinger hat with his trusty drunk-off-hypnotic-snickerdoodle cap, the Earp clan head to the farm where we learn a tidbit about Waverly’s father who was apparently named Julian and loved to see Mama run.

Haught pulls over Jolene and it is at this point where I clench my fists in fear – because while she may be a killer cook, I doubt Jolene has the patience to deal with traffic court. Is she going to stuff Haught in the trunk as the blood of a now-tongueless Revenant rolls down the rear bumper? Does Haught have insurance over her winter toques? Will Jolene julienne our precious unicorn?? Worse. She feeds her lemon. Scones. As if that monster couldn’t get any worse, she goes ahead and whips up one of the tastiest treats in all of humanity and TOTALLY REDEEMS HERSELF! (Just kidding – that honour is saved solely for the white chocolate brownie from Moxie’s Restaurant and I am not wrong at all with this statement).

After sending the Revenant, who they mistakenly believe to be the hungry-to-kill-Waverly demon, back to h-e-double hockey sticks (honestly anyone who refers to it that way deserves an express ticket straight there), Waverly hears the faint call of a woman “wanting to picnic” standing in the middle of a circle made of wood, awaiting the arrival of someone she wants to kill. Typical Canadian summer, really. Jolene transforms into her demon self and threatens Waverly, causing her to belt out another impressive scream in the same vein as last week. Wynonna and Mama notice a battered Jolene on the ground and reprimand Waves for causing harm to the friend they think they’ve known for forever.

Throughout the series, we’ve been introduced to characters that have certainly shaken the core foundation of our Crew; however there is something about Jolene’s unapologetic antagonism that I absolutely adore. Simply put, she does not give a f–ickerdoodle whose relationships she flambés into turmoil. She encounters Haught? Oh hey, you don’t get invited to super cool stakeouts because your friends think you’re lame. With Waverly? Oh hey, your girlfriend (who is my BEST FRIEND, by the way) thinks you’re impulsive. Wynonna? Oh hey, isn’t that your dapper gentleman caller’s wife from the Old West? Anyway, anybody want a cupcake?

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

I will say that despite my appreciation for those who excel in the Art of the Shit Stir, Jolene took it a step too far when she reassured Wynonna that that “half-sister” comment she made to Waverly was what she needed. Oh no, my friend. You may try all you can to brainwash Purgatory residents with deliciously dangerous baked goods and possibly even attempt to damn Waves for all eternity but damn it, I will not accept anyone who wants to break up the Earp sisters in this house! She also calls Nicole “Nikki.” That’s just gross.

After a rousing karaoke performance of her namesake, Jolene manages to wreak havoc amongst those at Shorty’s, so much so that Haught locks up Wynonna and Mama. The subsequent argument between her and Waverly, with Haught sporadically biting into a Jolemon Scone, left a pang in my heart no amount of white chocolate brownie could fix. Dominique Provost-Chalkley continues her supreme reign of breaking my heart this season with Waverly’s breakdown to Doc as he chows down on hypnotic cookies while basically telling her “you are what’s wrong with everything, darlin.”

The final ten minutes of the episode are a rollercoaster ride of every possible human emotion. We’ve got Wynonna and Mama busting out of their Jolene spell, telling Nedley to put that cookie down… NOW. We’ve got Jolene stating Waverly is a changeling and that she can’t cheerlead her way out of this one (watch her). The showdown between the two culminates in Jolene channeling her inner Gollum, pleading with her that she should put herself down because nobody likes her. Thankfully, that comment was the straw that woke the tree’s bark in the form of Bulshar himself – the clear descendent of the Wizard Of Oz tree was awaken following another delightful instalment of Waverly using everyday materials like brooms and shovels to incapacitate an enemy. After swallowing Jolene up whole, I couldn’t help but remember Not-Park Ranger Robin from last week’s episode and his mysterious disappearance at the hands (or should I say roots?) of an angry tree.

We also witness a Wayhaught reconciliation which, of course, is all I want out of life.

The episode concludes with Doc taunting Bulshar by flipping him off while wearing Bulshar’s ring he collected from Haught that suddenly appeared despite her previously throwing it into the snowy abyss. Nothing wrong may come from his decision to do this. Wynonna also visits a down-on-his-luck Bobo who corroborates Mama’s reveal that Waverly’s father is named Julian and oh he is apparently an actual, frigging angel. Yet another day in Purgatory!

“Jolene” features a virtually flawless mix of humour and inevitable doom that fits stupendously well within the world of Wynonna Earp. With the exception of Jeremy, who remained absent this episode, every key player is given their chance to shine this week, with Zoie Palmer being an impressive standout. In just an episode and a half, Jolene marinated the Purgatory universe with hysterical lines like, “Well, she did spend twenty years in a mental institution for being, you know, mental” and relishing in the madness she created. Side note: I’d like to give a shout out to Wynonna’s mention of Prison Break toward the beginning of the episode, as I felt validated with my “Michael Scofield” comment from last week: “…Mama morphs into Michael Scofield and breaks out of police custody, Peacemaker in hand, leaving Wynonna in the capable hands of the men who let her mother escape.

My 3 Favourite W’s of the Episode

I would now like to turn your attention to my 3 Favourite W’s for this episode of Wynonna Earp. These consist of favourite Wynonna Insult, Wayhaught Moment and Waverly Expression – the 3 pillars of any Wynonna Earp episode.

Wynonna Insult: “On top of everything else, we need to be an adult daycare centre?!”

Wayhaught Moment: Hands down, my favourite Wayhaught moment of the episode involves Waverly’s hand on Jolene’s face in a sharp, slapping motion at Shorty’s. Even while under the influence of a demon, Wayhaught ultimately reigns supreme in the face of someone who dares utilize the method that brought the two powerhouses together.

Waverly Expression

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

What did you think of “Jolene”? Let us know in the comments below.

Follow Ghezal Amiri on Twitter.

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Calgary Underground Film Festival

CUFF 2019: Director Rob Grant on the tension (and dark comedy) of HARPOON

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From director Rob Grant (Mon Ami, Fake Blood), Harpoon will make its Canadian premiere at the Calgary Underground Film Festival. Photo courtesy CUFF
From director Rob Grant (Mon Ami, Fake Blood), Harpoon will make its Canadian premiere at the Calgary Underground Film Festival April 28. Photo courtesy CUFF

Adrift on the seas on a luxury yacht, three friends find themselves stranded without food or supplies and quickly realize their survival is less than assured. An official selection at International Film Festival Rotterdam 2019, Harpoon will make its Canadian premiere at the Calgary Underground Film Festival (CUFF) April 28. 

The Mutt spoke with director Rob Grant prior to the film’s screening at CUFF. This interview has been edited and condensed for length.

THE MUTT: Can you tell me a bit about the genesis of Harpoon?

ROB GRANT: I had a great relationship with my producers (Knuckleball director Michael Peterson and Kurtis Harder) from a film called Fake Blood. I pitched Mr. Peterson on this idea that was a mix between Polanski’s Knife on the Water but by way of Seinfeld characters on the boat. I grew up in Vancouver, and the original idea was, “Well, I spent a lot of time on a boat, we could go take a boat out to the ocean and try to isolate ourselves out there.” Once a budget came into play and the idea grew, suddenly we were shooting the interiors of the boat in a set in the middle of freezing winter in Calgary, and shooting the exteriors on a boat in tropical Belize down south.

TM: Was it difficult for you to balance those comedic elements and still find a way to ratchet up the tension?

RG: It was very difficult, and there were a lot of discussions about that. When you have to give the elevator pitch, you have to say: “This is the genre and this is what it means.” But I subscribe to the logic that in life you can feel in one moment that you’re in a love story and the next minute in a horror movie, and that’s the way real life actually works. But it seems a little more rigid in movies. We were aware of potentially disrupting viewers’ experiences of watching the movie. (We thought) a movie could, or should, be multiple things at once. We’re willing to accept that there’s going to be some audience members that are going to reject that as a movie experience, but we wanted to try it.

Harpoon director Rob Grant said premiering the film at International Film Festival Rotterdam 2019 was a very validating experience. Photo courtesy CUFF

Harpoon director Rob Grant said premiering the film at International Film Festival Rotterdam 2019 was a very validating experience. Photo courtesy CUFF

TM: Can you tell me more about those influences you mentioned? I’m curious about how you mixed something like Seinfeld with more traditional thriller elements.

RG: Hitchcock’s Lifeboat was definitely in there, as well as Polanski’s Knife in the Water. But I had to still find the dark humour in it, and Seinfeld came up specifically because as much as we all find the Seinfeld characters enduring, they’re very much in it for themselves. They’re worried about their own outcomes. So I tried to use a lot of that. As much as these people like to say they’re looking out for each other, the second it becomes a survival story they’re all kind of in it for themselves. Paul Thomas Anderson’s Magnolia was another one, not only for mixing drama and humour, but definitely because the narration was less focused. It sets up what’s going to happen without speaking to much on the nose about what you’re about to see.

TM: I understand there’s some great gore and effects in Harpoon. What was your approach to that, and what effect do you think that has? 

RG: I’ve explored the effects of violence in cinema with Fake Blood, and this was an extension of that. The entire movie, these people speak very casually and aloof about the things that potentially will need to be done without actually considering what that entails until suddenly when it happens. I felt like it would be a good idea to make sure that was extremely violent and horrible, not only because we’ve been teasing up to this moment, but I do believe there’s a certain element that people do not consider the actual realities of having to do something like that. So it’s very shocking, very brutal, it’s like, “ha ha ha this was all funny to discuss” and now that it’s happened it sucks the wind out of you. That was a very intentional decision.

TM: What do you think Harpoon does in a unique way when compared to other similar films? What do you hope the audience walks away with?

RG: I hope when people leave the cinema that it wasn’t the movie they were expecting, that it was a little bit of a different take. I do think it’ll challenge them depending what their expectations are. I just hope they’re expecting something interesting in the genre, and that they’re along for the ride.

Harpoon makes its Canadian premiere at the Calgary Underground Film Festival April 28. For tickets, click here

Click here to read our roundup of 9 Canadian films playing at CUFF 2019.

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Calgary Underground Film Festival

CUFF 2019: The story behind Uwe Boll, the so-called “worst filmmaker” ever

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F*** You All: The Uwe Boll Story dives into the background of the notorious filmmaker, featuring a number of interviews with colleagues, critics and with Boll himself. Photo courtesy CUFF
F*** You All: The Uwe Boll Story dives into the background of the notorious filmmaker, featuring a number of interviews with colleagues, critics and with Boll himself. Photo courtesy CUFF

Director of the critically-maligned video game adaptations Alone in the Dark, House of the Dead and BloodRayne, Uwe Boll has long held a unfavourable reputation in the film industry not only due to the perceived quality of his films, but also due to his antagonistic response to his online “haters.” 

But a new documentary, F*** You All: The Uwe Boll Story, seeks to better understand the firebrand filmmaker, diving into Boll’s past through a series of interviews with colleagues, critics and Boll himself. 

The Mutt spoke with F*** You All: The Uwe Boll Story Vancouver-based director Sean Patrick Shaul prior to the film’s Alberta premiere at the Calgary Underground Film Festival April 27. This interview has been edited and condensed for length.

THE MUTT: How did you first become acquainted with Uwe Boll?

SEAN PATRICK SHAUL: I first met Uwe Boll on the set of Assault on Wall Street. I worked as a crew member with him. Seeing him work was so fascinating. The way he directed was like no one I had ever seen before. He was such an interesting guy. That was almost 10 years ago and I ended up working on a TV show that was shooting in his restaurant. That was how I came across the idea for the documentary. The idea was to look at someone who is widely known as the world’s worst director. It was more asking, “Why was he considered that? How did he get that title, and whether or not he was.”

TM: As his persona on the internet developed, did that mesh with what you knew of him? Did you feel he was being portrayed in a way that was inaccurate?

SPS: I had seen some of his movies and I understood the reputation he had. He also fuelled that himself through the internet, engaging with all of these trolls and these critics. He takes it head on, which is fun to watch. But I had no idea what he would say when I pitched the documentary to him. Within five minutes, I realized we had a lot in common. He was excited about the documentary, excited to have that side told of it.

Vancouver-based director Sean Patrick Shaul first encountered Uwe Boll on the set of the 2013 action thriller Assault on Wall Street. Photo courtesy CUFF

Vancouver-based director Sean Patrick Shaul first encountered Uwe Boll on the set of the 2013 action thriller Assault on Wall Street. Photo courtesy CUFF

TM: How does Boll feel about being referred to as the “world’s worst director”?

SPS: He thinks it’s very unfair, which I guess I would agree with. Art is subjective, so it’s hard to say whether something is good or bad. But I think he’s also aware of the type of movies he was making. He didn’t think he was making The Godfather. He knew these were video game adaptations movies, so his expectations were low with those. But he has made more personal films (since then), but he already had this black cloud following him around. It stalled his career in that way. I thought that was really interesting – he made 32 movies, but by his fifth movie, people had already written him off.

TM: Why do you think Boll feels the need to respond to his trolls and his critics online?

SPS: I think he’s a very proud guy. He’s aware of his accomplishments and I don’t think he can let a comment like that go. If someone has the motivation to go after him online, he has the equivalent motivation to fire back at them. He hasn’t really calmed down on that too much. I think he’s currently banned from Twitter for going after trolls. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek for him when he goes after these people. He enjoys it, he likes engaging with them. It became part of his personality. As much as it hurt his career, it also helped his career in a way.

TM: In spending time with Boll, what surprised you about him as you got to know him better?

SPS: Before, I thought he was kind of an asshole, from his online persona, I thought he was just kind of a jerk. Through meeting him, I realized he’s a super sweet guy, he’s a really, really genuinely nice guy. He cares about films, he’s a real film guy. He knows all of the classics, he’s seen all these foreign films – he’s a real cinephile. But there’s something about him not being able to pull that off. All his favourite movies are the classics, but for some reason he can’t make those films himself. He was kind of handcuffed by all these tax loopholes and funding schedules, that he would have to pump these films out in a certain timeframe to get the tax credit. There’s a lot of reasons his earlier films turned out the way they did. They didn’t turn out the way he envisioned.

TM: Given that he knew the documentary wasn’t going to be all positive, why did Boll want to participate?

SPS: I think he just wanted someone who was looking at the larger picture instead of comparing him to a Tommy Wiseau or a Ed Wood. He wanted to explain himself a bit. The articles and the small kinds of podcast interviews don’t really give him enough time to explain himself, or they ask the same five questions. Almost every headline is “world’s worst director” – I think he wanted to look at something deeper. But he wasn’t shying away from that title. I told him early on in production that we’d be definitely looking at that angle and talking about it. He was more than happy to look at it. Most people would want this buried, but he looked at it head on. “I have that title, but let’s look at why.”

F*** You All: The Uwe Boll story plays April 27 at the Calgary Underground Film Festival. For tickets, click here.

Click here to read our roundup of 9 Canadian films playing at CUFF 2019.

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Acquainted takes a raw and honest look at modern love

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Acquainted stars Giacomo Gianniotti and Laysla De Oliveria as Drew and Emma, two high school classmates who discover sparks between them upon reuniting, despite the two both being involved in committed relationships. Photo courtesy Red Eye Media
Acquainted stars Giacomo Gianniotti and Laysla De Oliveria as Drew and Emma, two high school classmates who discover sparks between them upon reuniting, despite the two both being involved in committed relationships. Photo courtesy Red Eye Media

In Acquainted, a new romantic drama from Toronto-based director Natty Zavitz, high school classmates Drew (Giacomo Gianniotti of Grey’s Anatomy) and Emma (Laysla De Oliveria of The Gifted) reunite with each other at a bar and instantly connect, discovering they share some serious chemistry. Problem is, the pair are both in serious, long-term relationships.

The script for the film was partly inspired by the deterioration of Zavitz’s last major relationship, said producer Jonathan Keltz (Entourage, Reign), who also plays Allan in the film.

“(Zavitz) sent me the script almost four years ago and I just connected so deeply and was so blown away by his script,” Keltz said. “(I was blown away) by how defined his voice was. I was completely moved by it.”

Inspired by films such as Richard Linklater’s Before Sunset trilogy, Acquainted is an honest look at relationships and adulthood, exploring the subject matter with introspection. Keltz said the film examines fidelity and infidelity from a judgement-free place.

Alongside Gianniotti and De Oliveria, Acquainted also stars Johnathan Keltz (Entourage, Reign), Rachel Skarsten and Parveen Kaur. Photo courtesy Red Eye Media

Alongside Gianniotti and De Oliveria, Acquainted also stars Johnathan Keltz (Entourage, Reign), Rachel Skarsten and Parveen Kaur. Photo courtesy Red Eye Media

“The characters are not villains or victims. It’s a raw and honest look at being in relationships, to have these type of things happen and how to deal with that,” he said. “The relationship with the self and the seeking to find out who you really are is really what’s crucial to the building of a relationship with somebody else.

“It’s about taking the time to do that work that puts you in the best position to be a partner with somebody and to be an adult in this world.”

Many of the cast and crew on Acquainted have worked in Toronto’s film community for years, making the set of the film a reunion of its own. 

“In front of the camera and behind the camera, (the film involves all) kinds of amazing artists. It’s really a Canadian film and a Toronto film,” Keltz said. “It’s not trying to either hide that or beat you over the head with that.

“I think that’s done in a very unique way, and in a way that is both Torontonian and Canadian but also universally and commercially viable.”

Keltz said he thought the film would be emotionally affecting to audiences, offering perspective that could help to contextualize modern love and relationship.

“I think this is a really raw and honest and beautiful film about what it means to be in love, to be heartbroken, to be devastated, to be inspired and to try and build a life for yourself and figure out what that means,” Keltz said.

Acquainted is now playing at Cineplex Movies Yonge and Dundas in Toronto, International Village in Vancouver and at Landmark Cinemas nationwide.

Next up on The Mutt: With maturity and depth, An Audience of Chairs reflects on mental illness

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