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Wynonna Earp showcases the power of a demonic snickerdoodle

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Wynonna Earp airs Fridays at 9 p.m. E.T. on Space. Photo courtesy Bell Media
Wynonna Earp airs Fridays at 9 p.m. E.T. on Space. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Spoilers follow for Wynonna Earp Season 3, Episode 5, “Jolene.”

We ended off last week’s episode with a stranger named Jolene treating our favourite Purgatory residents with baked goods that apparently cause them to lose their sense of logic and rationale. A great pastry has that effect, really.

The influence of Jolene bleeds through the opening of this week’s Wynonna Earp episode titled – hold onto your hats – “Jolene.” It’s made clear that the scrumptious snacks she creates have a jarring effect whenever eaten, essentially causing Jo-Jo (as Wynonna lovingly refers to her) to be the centre of one’s universe. Let’s be real, anyone who offers up a freshly-out-of-the-oven-pie gains a point or two in my book. When Jolene quickly stuffs Mama Gibson’s face to further her control over the Crew, the Earps and Doc decide on heading to Gibson Farm, where Waverly was born, in order to summon and bind the demon vying to kill her (unbeknownst to everyone, said demon is the cream puff master standing before them).

Although Jolene is a mysteriously sinister force of evil determined to rid this world of the glory that is Waverly Earp, I do have to commend her on using my most commonly used excuse to get out of social engagements: “Oh, I can’t go to the party… I have so much baking to do!” After she convinces Doc to replace his resident Gun Slinger hat with his trusty drunk-off-hypnotic-snickerdoodle cap, the Earp clan head to the farm where we learn a tidbit about Waverly’s father who was apparently named Julian and loved to see Mama run.

Haught pulls over Jolene and it is at this point where I clench my fists in fear – because while she may be a killer cook, I doubt Jolene has the patience to deal with traffic court. Is she going to stuff Haught in the trunk as the blood of a now-tongueless Revenant rolls down the rear bumper? Does Haught have insurance over her winter toques? Will Jolene julienne our precious unicorn?? Worse. She feeds her lemon. Scones. As if that monster couldn’t get any worse, she goes ahead and whips up one of the tastiest treats in all of humanity and TOTALLY REDEEMS HERSELF! (Just kidding – that honour is saved solely for the white chocolate brownie from Moxie’s Restaurant and I am not wrong at all with this statement).

After sending the Revenant, who they mistakenly believe to be the hungry-to-kill-Waverly demon, back to h-e-double hockey sticks (honestly anyone who refers to it that way deserves an express ticket straight there), Waverly hears the faint call of a woman “wanting to picnic” standing in the middle of a circle made of wood, awaiting the arrival of someone she wants to kill. Typical Canadian summer, really. Jolene transforms into her demon self and threatens Waverly, causing her to belt out another impressive scream in the same vein as last week. Wynonna and Mama notice a battered Jolene on the ground and reprimand Waves for causing harm to the friend they think they’ve known for forever.

Throughout the series, we’ve been introduced to characters that have certainly shaken the core foundation of our Crew; however there is something about Jolene’s unapologetic antagonism that I absolutely adore. Simply put, she does not give a f–ickerdoodle whose relationships she flambés into turmoil. She encounters Haught? Oh hey, you don’t get invited to super cool stakeouts because your friends think you’re lame. With Waverly? Oh hey, your girlfriend (who is my BEST FRIEND, by the way) thinks you’re impulsive. Wynonna? Oh hey, isn’t that your dapper gentleman caller’s wife from the Old West? Anyway, anybody want a cupcake?

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

I will say that despite my appreciation for those who excel in the Art of the Shit Stir, Jolene took it a step too far when she reassured Wynonna that that “half-sister” comment she made to Waverly was what she needed. Oh no, my friend. You may try all you can to brainwash Purgatory residents with deliciously dangerous baked goods and possibly even attempt to damn Waves for all eternity but damn it, I will not accept anyone who wants to break up the Earp sisters in this house! She also calls Nicole “Nikki.” That’s just gross.

After a rousing karaoke performance of her namesake, Jolene manages to wreak havoc amongst those at Shorty’s, so much so that Haught locks up Wynonna and Mama. The subsequent argument between her and Waverly, with Haught sporadically biting into a Jolemon Scone, left a pang in my heart no amount of white chocolate brownie could fix. Dominique Provost-Chalkley continues her supreme reign of breaking my heart this season with Waverly’s breakdown to Doc as he chows down on hypnotic cookies while basically telling her “you are what’s wrong with everything, darlin.”

The final ten minutes of the episode are a rollercoaster ride of every possible human emotion. We’ve got Wynonna and Mama busting out of their Jolene spell, telling Nedley to put that cookie down… NOW. We’ve got Jolene stating Waverly is a changeling and that she can’t cheerlead her way out of this one (watch her). The showdown between the two culminates in Jolene channeling her inner Gollum, pleading with her that she should put herself down because nobody likes her. Thankfully, that comment was the straw that woke the tree’s bark in the form of Bulshar himself – the clear descendent of the Wizard Of Oz tree was awaken following another delightful instalment of Waverly using everyday materials like brooms and shovels to incapacitate an enemy. After swallowing Jolene up whole, I couldn’t help but remember Not-Park Ranger Robin from last week’s episode and his mysterious disappearance at the hands (or should I say roots?) of an angry tree.

We also witness a Wayhaught reconciliation which, of course, is all I want out of life.

The episode concludes with Doc taunting Bulshar by flipping him off while wearing Bulshar’s ring he collected from Haught that suddenly appeared despite her previously throwing it into the snowy abyss. Nothing wrong may come from his decision to do this. Wynonna also visits a down-on-his-luck Bobo who corroborates Mama’s reveal that Waverly’s father is named Julian and oh he is apparently an actual, frigging angel. Yet another day in Purgatory!

“Jolene” features a virtually flawless mix of humour and inevitable doom that fits stupendously well within the world of Wynonna Earp. With the exception of Jeremy, who remained absent this episode, every key player is given their chance to shine this week, with Zoie Palmer being an impressive standout. In just an episode and a half, Jolene marinated the Purgatory universe with hysterical lines like, “Well, she did spend twenty years in a mental institution for being, you know, mental” and relishing in the madness she created. Side note: I’d like to give a shout out to Wynonna’s mention of Prison Break toward the beginning of the episode, as I felt validated with my “Michael Scofield” comment from last week: “…Mama morphs into Michael Scofield and breaks out of police custody, Peacemaker in hand, leaving Wynonna in the capable hands of the men who let her mother escape.

My 3 Favourite W’s of the Episode

I would now like to turn your attention to my 3 Favourite W’s for this episode of Wynonna Earp. These consist of favourite Wynonna Insult, Wayhaught Moment and Waverly Expression – the 3 pillars of any Wynonna Earp episode.

Wynonna Insult: “On top of everything else, we need to be an adult daycare centre?!”

Wayhaught Moment: Hands down, my favourite Wayhaught moment of the episode involves Waverly’s hand on Jolene’s face in a sharp, slapping motion at Shorty’s. Even while under the influence of a demon, Wayhaught ultimately reigns supreme in the face of someone who dares utilize the method that brought the two powerhouses together.

Waverly Expression

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

Wynonna Earp Season 3 Episode 5 – Jolene. Photo courtesy Bell Media

What did you think of “Jolene”? Let us know in the comments below.

Follow Ghezal Amiri on Twitter.

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There Are No Fakes is a shocking journey into the world of art fraud

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Directed by Jamie Kastner, There Are No Fakes is a shocking feature-length documentary that centres on the work of Norval Morrisseau. Photo courtesy Cave 7 Productions
Directed by Jamie Kastner, There Are No Fakes is a shocking feature-length documentary that centres on the work of Norval Morrisseau. Photo courtesy Cave 7 Productions

Some of the best documentaries of the past two decades involve hard left turns – films that begin in one direction but end in another due to events that unfolded during production. There Are No Fakes, directed by Jamie Kastner, joins that select company of documentary as its comedic opening slowly morphs into something much darker.

There Are No Fakes centers on the work of Norval Morrisseau, the Indigenous Canadian artist of the Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation, sometimes referred to as the “Picasso of the North”. Morrisseau, who died in 2007, sought to remove forgeries of his art from the marketplace, establishing the Norval Morrisseau Heritage Society in 2005.

After Kevin Hearn (of Barenaked Ladies fame) buys one of Morrisseau’s paintings, he starts to doubt its authenticity and discovers a bizarre feud consolidated around Morrisseau. It’s this conflict, and the dark secrets hidden beneath it, that form the backdrop of There Are No Fakes.

Kastner (The Secret Disco Revolution, Free Trade Is Killing My Mother), who was friends with Hearn in high school, learned through conversation about Hearn’s ongoing lawsuit surrounding the Morrisseau paintings. It became clear to Kastner that such a story would be perfect for his next project.

“It was almost unbelievable. There was so much crazy stuff in this story, I couldn’t quite believe it,” Kastner said. “I told him if I was going to proceed with it, though we were friends he would have no editorial control. As a journalist, I would be talking to both sides, and he agreed.

“I went off on my own doing my own kind of digging and research. Lo and behold, everything he told me and then some turned out to be the case.”

Norval Morrisseau of the Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation was sometimes referred to as the "Picasso of the North". Photo courtesy Cave 7 Productions

Norval Morrisseau of the Bingwi Neyaashi Anishinaabek First Nation was sometimes referred to as the “Picasso of the North”. Photo courtesy Cave 7 Productions

As the story unfolded and as Kastner continued to meet a succession of larger-than-life characters, he found himself shocked at what he uncovered. Bringing footage back to his editor provoked a similar reaction.

“He’d say, ‘Holy f***!’ Then I’d do another one, and he’s quite an even-keeled guy, and he’d say ‘holy f***,’” Kastner said. “So it was a series of ‘holy f***’ moments. I tried to recreate that experience for the audience.”

Documentaries can often unfold much as expected, with a known story dictating the outcome of the production. But given the fluid situation surrounding the events of There Are No Fakes, Kastner followed the story as it led him, knowing he had been handed an incredible gift.

“It’s definitely a privilege and a responsibility (to tell this story). You’re dealing with the legacy of one of our most important artists,” he said. “You wind up dealing with very serious issues of abuse of different kinds, so I felt a real responsibility.

“You have to handle it very carefully as a documentary filmmaker. It really is so unique and unusual and special and horrific and inspiring and a whole range of things that you don’t usually get in one film.”

There Are No Fakes made its world premiere at Hot Docs 2019, receiving highly positive reviews. Kastner said the film provided fascinating insight into the legacy of Morrisseau, touching on multiple problems still at play in Canada.

“It’s a very dramatic story. People can’t believe that they’re real people. They seem like characters out of some HBO series or something,” Kastner said. “I think it’s a very entertaining, edge of your seat, jaw-dropping type of story that happens to be a documentary.”

There Are No Fakes will screen at multiple locations throughout Canada in July 2019. For more information, click here.

Next to read on The Mutt: Tantoo Cardinal propels Falls Around Her in first leading role

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Isabelle brings psychological terror to an idyllic neighbourhood

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Starring Adam Brody, Amanda Crew, Zoë Belkin and others, Isabelle returns to Canada for a theatrical run starting June 28. Photo courtesy GAT PR.
Starring Adam Brody, Amanda Crew, Zoë Belkin and others, Isabelle returns to Canada for a theatrical run starting June 28. Photo courtesy GAT PR.

In a quaint New England neighbourhood, a charming young couple (Adam Brody and Amanda Crew) find the perfect home to move into. But what they find in that home complicates their dream to start a family, as darkness and paranoia emerges in director Rob Heydon’s Isabelle.

Following in the footsteps of other psychological horrors such as Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist, Isabelle comes from a screenplay written by Donald Martin (Milton’s Secret). Having grown up watching genre films like The Omen and The Shining, Heydon approached the project looking to put his own stamp on psychological terror.

“Reading the script, I just got into it cold. Then once I got into it, I couldn’t put it down,” Heydon said. “I thought a lot about what other references it could be like and how I could help bring something to the story and the storytelling.”

Much like other films in the genre, Heydon’s intention for Isabelle was to emphasize the psychology of the terror as a priority. That meant slowly building up the characters and introducing new elements throughout the runtime of the film.

“In a sense, it’s trying to tell a story in three arcs and build the audience’s expectations up to the third act,” Heydon said. “We used the combination of cinematography and editing and music to bring the audience into the mind of the main character and have the audience experience what our main characters are going through.”

Isabelle made its world premiere in South Korea in October 2018, and has since played at 33 film festivals around the world. Photo courtesy GAT PR

Isabelle made its world premiere in South Korea in October 2018, and has since played at 33 film festivals around the world. Photo courtesy GAT PR

The strength of the cast – which includes Brody, Crew and Zoë Belkin as Isabelle – was essential given the nature of the material. Brody was the first to sign on, but other cast members took longer to materialize.

“Amanda Crew wasn’t available at the same time. So it took almost two years to put together the cast,” Heydon said. “But when their calendars lined up, we also got some amazing talent to surround them. Belkin, Sheila McCarthy, who played Isabelle’s mom… we were really lucky.”

Isabelle shot in Hamilton, Ont., with old Victorian homes posing as New England. Beyond the locale, Heydon said the cost savings attained shooting in Hamilton were significant.

“In Toronto, to rent a house for a day might be 10 or 15 thousand per day. In Hamilton, we were lucky to get three houses right next to each other for 20 days for $20,000,” he said. “You just can’t find that anywhere in Toronto.”

Having initially premiered in South Korea as part of the Busan Film Festival (along with fellow Canadian horror Lifechanger), Isabelle will now open to a larger release in Canada. Heydon said genre aficionados should find much to enjoy in Isabelle.

“I’d say read what the film’s about and check out the trailer – I think the trailer says it all. And if you’re interested, come check it out,” he said.

Isabelle begins its theatrical run in Toronto June 28 at the Carlton Cinema. For more information, click here.

Next up on The Mutt: Horror materializes in unconventional ways in Things Fall Apart

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Horror materializes in unconventional ways in Things Fall Apart

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Things Fall Apart, the first feature from director/writer Hussein Juma, plays June 2 at the Globe Cinema in Calgary. Photo courtesy Hussein Juma
Things Fall Apart, the first feature from director/writer Hussein Juma, plays June 2 at the Globe Cinema in Calgary. Photo courtesy Hussein Juma

Those familiar with Hussein Juma, director and writer of Things Fall Apart, know that it’s somewhat fruitless to attempt to fully summarize his work. That’s largely by design – Juma himself says he enjoys injecting ambiguity into his projects.

But more than that, what’s exciting about Juma as a director is his ability to create a sense of atmospheric dread based heavily on context and character and not cliché. So horror fans on the hunt for films that are likely to surprise should take note of what Juma says about his first feature, Things Fall Apart.

“If you like arthouse cinema, things that are going to challenge you and even scare you a little too, I think this film would be for you,” Juma says. “If you’re interested in new ways to tell stories, in indie cinema and the way it can reframe things and put them in different contexts, I think there’s a lot to think about with this film.”

That unique approach to story was evident throughout Juma’s 12-episode web series Horse Mask, a surreal horror that centres around a missing daughter, a forest and many mysterious masks. Though Things Fall Apart is Juma’s first feature, he says working on Horse Mask helped prepare him, given the fact that the runtime of that web series evens out to be around the length of a feature.

Set during a dinner party, Things Fall Apart lets audiences act as a sort of fly on the wall as tensions and emotions emerge.

“Things progressively get more tense between the characters. I think there’s a good balance — there are those moments where you’re going to feel uncomfortable, there are moments where you’re going to be scared, there are moments where you’re going to feel like, ‘What the hell is going on right now?’” Juma says.

Furthering his desire to tell a story in a fresh way, Juma says he employed improvised dialogue throughout Things Fall Apart, making up 80 per cent of the dialogue. Though actors were provided with full scripts, dialogue was written in beats that guided where conversations would go.

“When we finally selected our actors, we extensively rehearsed it multiple times. That was a really cool process,” Juma says. “I had a bare-bones, skeleton idea of where I wanted each conversation to go, but these actors got so into it and took it to interesting places. (Many times) I was like, ‘Oh yeah, that’s great. We have to keep that.’”

Through using improvised dialogue, Juma says he was able to capture the essence of a dinner party, complete with moments of levity, tension and awkwardness. Photo courtesy Hussein Juma

Through using improvised dialogue, Juma says he was able to capture the essence of a dinner party, complete with moments of levity, tension and awkwardness. Photo courtesy Hussein Juma

The cast, which includes Chengis Javeri (one of the leads in Horse Mask), Bobbi Goddard, Gina Lorene and more, was already familiar to Juma, giving him confidence that they would be able to pull off the improvised dialogue. Juma says surrounding himself with smart, funny people led to a number of happy accidents that made their way into the finished product.

Other times, Juma says he would play off what he knew about the actors themselves.

“If I could see even a sliver of tension between them in the real world or a sliver of something in a look that I see, I can kind of harness that in the film,” he says. “I think that worked really well in terms of when I wanted to play someone against another person. Because I worked with them before, I knew things I could whisper in their ear before a take to throw them off.”

Ultimately, Juma says he wanted to make a film that he would want to see himself. Based on his track record, it’s likely that horror fans looking for a surprising, experimental feature with strong character work will find it in Things Fall Apart.

Things Fall Apart plays June 2 at 2 p.m. at the Globe Cinema in Calgary. For more information, click here.

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